Monday, July 6, 2015

The Maybelline Story...Fascinating, Stimulating, Gripping makes you wanting for more!,


The Maybelline Story starts a century ago and takes you though the interesting life of founder Tom Lyle Williams and his fascinating family as he climbs his way to achieving the all American dream. Cross country it will take you from Chicago to Hollywood, mingling with the who's who in each era and location. Read how a fluke turned into a simple product, and how it turned into an international sensation and empire. Follow their families lives for One Hundred years.        

The Maybelline Story is one that has left a lasting impression upon America, yet not many realize just how vital a role the cosmetic brand has played in shaping idealism today.  The obsession with perfection is widely seen throughout Hollywood, as it was nearly 100 years ago.  However, the obsession at that time did not reach the rest of society as it has today.  Early cosmetic developers, such as founder Tom Lyle Williams of the Maybelline Co. brought cosmetics to the everyday woman, pushing the idea that every woman, young and old, regardless of class, can obtain glamour and beauty with a simple swish of the eyes.  That’s where Maybelline got its start.  Developed in a time where women were breaking away from being modest and obedient housewives, and starting to seek their right as legal voters and equals in society.


The story captivates all audiences by its incredible survival through economic, social, and personal turmoil.  The Maybelline Story takes you on a journey through 20th century America, and into the 21st centurywhere Maybelline thrives as a billion-dollar Icon, the world’s largest cosmetic brand.  For Tom Lyle, the journey was not easy, as the brand tears his family and their world apart, yet brings them together to re-discover what they had before they had millions.....each other. 

1 comment:

  1. How I've come to read The Story: Elsewhere in Sharrie's writings, she noted having enjoyed "burgers" in her youth (before getting into Veggie stuff!) at a Culver City joint called Woody's Smorgasburgers. I worked at a different one, but occassionally subbed at CC and so...in terms of "Full Disclosure"...never had the pleasure of serving her as I certainly would have remembered per her "classiness". In any event, while reading and commenting in a nostalgic Blog about long gone restaurants in LA , a former manager unexpectedly commented about The Maybelline Story http://tinyurl.com/pwjjg2o which led to my being curious to pick it up to read and commenting like this therein: (BTW: Neither he nor I have had an 'in person' liaison with Sharrie!)
    If truth be told, I've become embarrassingly lazy when it comes to reading books! Being surprized by Phil's exuberance however, I picked up a copy. So as the topic does not get lost lest my reading slows down, I'd like to note that after only the first 86 pages last night (10/10/15), you will find this is not what might be easily presumed to be a girly-girl reading about "make-up". In addition, and despite stereotypes that may come to mind for some, given Sharrie's 'cuteness', this is well written prose that most Guys will enjoy.
    Pardon: I was far from being an English Lit major so am not precise with "terms" in trying to describe it. Sharrie has gathered known and factual family history and 'filled in' plausible narrative to make it other than dry facts to create what I'm thinking is known as in the genre of being a historical novel. E.g. taking known facts and fleshing-in what most likely was said by the actual characters. Surely, I stand to be corrected.
    What caught my eye so far and caused me to write this, is the inspirational example that many of today's 'downtrodden' teens might take a page from "Tom Lyle" in getting their act together rather than falling prey to the victimizers who ascribe and forecast one's never- changing/hopeless condition in life to the harsh world we live in through no fault of our own. While I don't yet know "how" The Story turns out, it's been great so far and I Second Phil's enthusiasm.

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