Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Rudolph Valentino's statue, "Aspiration" is still inspiring us to achieve our ambitions


The Villa Valentino, 1938. Chet Hewes, Ches Hains, Eva Williams Haines, Tom Lyle Williams, Mabel Williams Hewes.

An interesting article found in Tom Lyle Williams, sister, Eva's, archives has recently surfaced and was sent to me by her grandson, Jerry Westhouse. I've added pictures for my readers enjoyment. 

Tom Lyle Williams and Emery Shaver at the Villa Valentino in 1935, standing in front of Tom Lyle's, 1934 Packard


The statue, "Aspiration" was created in honor of Rudolph Valentino in 1930. Four years after his untimely death in 1926.  When Tom Lyle Williams purchased the Villa Valentino, in the Hollywood Hills, he had a copy of  "Aspiration" made and placed overlooking the pool. In the late 1940's, the Villa Valentino was destroyed by Eminent Domain, for the Hollywood Freeway. Today if you are on the Hollywood freeway at Vine, look up to your right and you will still see the foundation of the Villa Valentino. Tom Lyle Williams and his partner, Emery Shaver moved to Bel Air California and built a modern glass and steel home.




After Tom Lyle's death in 1976, his nephew's Bill and Noel Williams, had Aspiration recreated off the original mold and each of them placed it in their homes. After Bill and Noel passed away, their statues were given to Noel Williams son Chuck Williams, and my father Bill Williams statue was given to me. 


"Aspiration" reminds us to never stop aspiring towards our dreams.   A hope or ambition of achieving something: The Maybelline Story carries this theme throughout the book.


2 comments:

  1. Very cool statue. Definitely aspirational.

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  2. Yes Amanda, He encourages me to never stop aspiring towards my dream.

    ReplyDelete