Monday, December 11, 2017

"How Stuff is Made" @Refinery 29 Great Lash Mascara by Maybelline a cult favorite for over 46 years



                                 "GREAT LASH" Mascara





Maybelline debuted its "Great Lash Mascara" in 1971. It is still recognized by it's
 Pink and Green Chartreuse packaging inspired by Lilly Pulitzer's vibrant hues and
 prints. It's been a staple on drugstores shelves and in cosmetic bags ever since.
 It has been reported that a "Great Lash Maybelline Mascara," is sold every
1.2 seconds. 


Called the protein Mascara "Great Lash" builds rich, full body onto lashes.
 Marketing people asked Maybelline Company researchers in 1970,  to come up
 with a Mascara to thicken and lengthen lashes better than anything on the market
 and would be easy to apply.  "Great Lash" was that product. 
            

Surveys taken by Maybelline's marketing team at the time indicated consumers
 didn't consider Maybelline products fashionable, still using the original "Eye" logo.  Updating product colors changed customer perceptions. Especially the teen market


The Lilly Pulitzer Brand was popular with high society. Because Pulitzer was close
 friends with Jackie Kennedy, her designs crowned her "The Queen of Prep." And,
 "Flower Power."



From the inspiration and dedication of Tom Lyle Williams to the the Merchandiser
of Maybelline's new owners,  Schering Plough in 1971, Maybelline's "Great Lash"
has remained an all time favorite Mascara for the last 46 years. 


I was contacted by Refinery 29, who Produces an online show called "How Stuff is Made." For permission to use some of my Maybelline Family photos.

Here is the video. No credit was given to me. It's a nice piece of history and well made.  I sent them a copy of my book, The Maybelline Story. They may do on article on their website. If so I will post it. 




Monday, December 4, 2017

@VintageNews Thomas Lyle Williams created the first Maybelline mascara using petroleum jelly, coal dust, and ashes of a burnt cork




 Domagoj Valjak Story taken directly
 from The Maybelline Story
Maybelline, currently known as Maybelline New York, is one of the most famous makeup brands in the world. In recent decades it has been publicly represented by numerous celebrities, including Miranda Kerr, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jessica White, Kristin Davis, and Adriana Lima. Maybelline New York is now a subsidiary of the French cosmetics giant L’Oreal, but it was once an independent makeup company. It was founded in 1915 by a young entrepreneur named Thomas Lyle Williams, who created the very first American mascara.

Williams was born in Morganfield, Kentucky, in 1896 and moved to Chicago in the early 1910s. He briefly worked for Montgomery Ward, a company that printed mail-order catalogs and shipped products to customers across the United States, but his dream was to found his own mail-order company. He spent most of his free time trying to invent some new product which would be appealing enough to jump-start his business. He never planned on inventing a new product; the revolutionary idea of a mascara came to him after his sister suffered an accident.

In early 1915, Williams’ sister Mabel burned her eyebrows and eyelashes after her kitchen stove caught fire. After she extinguished the fire, she was very keen on hiding the fact that her eyebrows and eyelashes were nonexistent.

Williams watched her as she applied some of her homemade cosmetics, a dark paste made from petroleum jelly, some coal dust, and ashes left over from a burnt cork. He was surprised to see that Mabel actually succeeded in creating fashionable fake eyebrows and even concealing her scorched eyelashes. His sister inspired him to try and perfect her makeshift paste and sell it to women across the nation.

Thomas Lyle “Tom” Williams, Sr at 18 years old
That same year, Williams founded Maybelline Laboratories, a company that he named in honor of his resourceful sister. His first product was called the “Lash-Brow” and was made from similar ingredients to the ones used by his sister. He managed to sell some of it via mail order, but the product wasn’t very successful, because Williams lacked the knowledge of chemistry required to create a neutral fragrance and to make the paste water-resistant. However, he soon teamed up with a local drug manufacturer who added several chemicals and helped him fix these problems.

1920 ad for Maybelline.
This new and perfected product was called simply “Maybelline” and was advertised as “the first modern eye cosmetic for everyday use.” It was essentially a cake eyelash coupled with an eyebrow beautifier. When Williams started selling Maybelline, he didn’t know what to expect and was surprised to see that many women across the country fell in love with the product. By the early 1920s, his company was making astronomical amounts of money and he became known as a clever entrepreneur and a respected businessman.


Ad for Maybelline eyebrow and eyelash darkener with actress Ethel Clayton, on page 116 of the January 1922 Photoplay
In 1929, Maybelline Laboratories introduced a new line of cosmetics that featured eyeshadow and eyebrow pencils. This new line was an instant success and only proved that Williams was a true visionary of makeup cosmetics. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, Maybelline products were promoted by Hollywood divas such as Phyllis Haver, Ethel Clayton, Viola Dana, and Ruth Roland.
Williams enjoyed a life of luxury and success: After World War II, he and his life partner, Emery Shaver, moved into a grandiose mansion in the Hollywood Hills previously owned by the late film star and pop idol
Rudolph Valentino.

Thomas Lyle Williams Sr with his 14-year-old son, Thomas Lyle Williams Jr., in 1926
Maybelline Laboratories continued progressing as their international joint venture. Sadly, Shaver died in 1964, just after Maybelline Ultra Lash became the first internationally mass-produced makeup utility. Although business was booming, the grief-stricken Williams grew increasingly depressed and finally sold the company in 1967, three years after the death of his partner.

Joan Crawford from Modern Screen, January 1946, Maybelline advertisement, photography by Paul Hesse
The company was purchased by Plough Inc., a company from Memphis, Tennessee, which is nowadays known as Schering-Plough. Plough Inc. owned the company until 1990 and then sold it to Wasserstein Perella & Co., a New York-based investment firm whose marketing team invented the advertising slogan “(Maybe she’s born with it.) Maybe it’s Maybelline.” in 1991. The slogan is still used to advertise the brand and is instantly recognizable across the world. In 1996, Wasserstein Perella & Co. sold the company to its present owner, L’Oreal.
Thomas Lyle Williams died in 1976 and was buried next to Shaver at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale. Although he sold his company and quietly quit the business of makeup manufacture, he will always be known as the creator of the revolutionary Maybelline mascara.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Beach Boys number one Fan, Chuck Williams passed peacefully November 19, from Liver failure. Rest in Peace dearest Cuz

Those who knew Chuck will always remember his sharp wit and hysterical sense of humor. Here is a sample of Chuck, BB1 at his best, with me on a radio show in Santa Barbara CA.

Sharrie, Georgia and uncle Chuck 







https://www.photosnack.com/SharrieWilliams/chuckwilliamsbb1memorial.html please click for memorial click on speaker for music and arrow to keep it moving if it stops.



          Georgia with uncle Chuck at her Wedding



Page Liked · November 21 
 
Today, one of my best friends, Chuck Williams, lovingly known to many as BB1
 (Beach Boys’ #1 fan), passed away. He was an enormous, wonderful friend and
 a great fan. He even had a Beach Boys shrine in his home. I will truly miss him and the indomitable, passionate spirit he brought to life.
Peace & Love,
ML

Ladies we owe a debt of gratitude to a young lady called Maybel Williams Maybelline's namesake



The resourceful girl had a flash of inspiration and burned a cork, mixed the ashes with some Vaseline and then applied it to what was left of her lashes. In an instant she resembled a Hollywood starlet! ‘Eureka!’ – mascara was born ! Not exactly of course. The art of dying lashes goes back to Cleopatra, but there was no removable cosmetic of this kind that a woman could buy over the counter
.
Her brother Tom along with his brother Noel took this idea and developed Lash Brow Line – the worlds first commercially available mascara.In 1916 he changed the name to Maybelline – named after – you guessed it – Maybel Williams! The name being a combination of Maybel and Vaseline !

1920-lash brow-ine—early-Maybelline product
Eugene Rimmel is also credited for producing the first petroleum jelly mix but the product that we all know and love today is without question down to the success of Maybelline. The story of Maybelline is not only one of glamor and success but of mystery and intrigue which until recently has remained untold. The big money did not actually come in to the family until the company was sold in 1967.
1930s Maybelline makeup ad
In 1978  came the mysterious murder of the original  ‘Miss Maybelline’ – who died when her home was bombed. Maybelline heiress Sharrie Williams – Miss Maybelline’s grand-daughter  and Tom and Maybel's great niece – now tells the true story – and I can certainly say it has all the ingredients of a real dynasty drama in her book “The Maybelline Story” Sharrie has very kindly agreed to talk to Glamourdaze.
Sharrie , can you give us a quick synopsis of the Maybelline Story?
SW: The Maybelline Story traces the history of cosmetics in America and how one simple eye product caught the imagination of the public. Yet, unlike any other book about beauty, it reveals the never-before-told story of this man who invented mascara, Tom Lyle Williams (my great uncle)–a private figure who hid from the public because he was gay. To stay safe from the scrutiny of the press and government (which in the early thirties deemed mascara the “province of whores and homosexuals), Tom Lyle cloistered himself behind the gates of his Rudolph Valentino Villa and, with the help of his lifetime lover Emery, ran his empire from a distance. The deeper Tom Lyle went into hiding, the more his sister-in-law and ultra-ego Evelyn (my grandmother,) struggled her way to the spotlight. Attracted to bad boys, she married one–Tom Lyle’s playboy brother Preston (my grandfather). From that moment on, Evelyn used the Maybelline name–and later, its money–to reinvent herself from circus ballerina to flamboyant flapper, extravagant socialite to dinner theater star. Now, after nearly a century of silence, this true story celebrates the lives of a forgotten American hero–one man forced to remain behind a mask, and one woman whose hunger for beauty ultimately destroyed her. Spanning three generations, The Maybelline Story shows the hidden haunts of sudden fortune, and the tragedy that ensues when vanity lets loose. Finally, it speaks to women s’ decade-long desires–to be beautiful and be loved–and asks the question: At what price, beauty?
What is interesting is that the whole family became involved in Tom’s enterprise starting with your great uncle Noel along with your grandad Preston and grand aunt Eva! Did Mabel have anything to do with the business?
SW:Tom Lyle renamed his first eye beauty product Lash-Brow-Ine, to Maybelline in honor of his sister Mabel who gave him the idea for mascara, in 1915.  She had burned her lashes and brows tried to make them grow back and look darker by mixing a concoction of Vaseline and ash from a burned cork in her hand and applying it to her brows and lashes.  Tom Lyle took the idea to a chemist and Maybell Laboratories was born.
Your Grandmother Evelyn became the first Miss Maybelline ?
SW: My grandmother got that title when she opened a Dinner Theater in Hot Springs Arkansas in 1978.  She promoted herself as Miss Maybelline  “Last of the Red Hot Mama’s!” Her story ends in tragedy.

Evelyn Williams with her glamorous sisters Verona-and–Bunny-1922
What are your memories of visiting your grand uncle Tom as a young teenager ? I suppose there was lots of free make-up on the go !
SW: My favorite memory is driving all my best girlfriends up to his  estate in Bel Air California, in my blue and white 1957 Chevy so we could get some samples of Maybelline for a raffle our Club was having. He not only gave us the raffle samples, he gave us a giant box of Maybelline products to split up between us. It was the most exciting thing that could happen to a bunch of 17 year old High School girls – a years supply of our favorite cosmetics for free!

Tom-Lyle-Williams—Maybelline-founder

Sharrie-Williams-with-Tom-Lyle–Maybelline-founder
As Maybelline took off with glamorous stars like Clara Bow lending their name to the brand – it must have been very exciting. Did your grandfather Preston and your great uncle Tom Lyle enjoy the trappings of Hollywood and all that went with it? It appears that while Preston partied – Tom kept his nose to the grind- stone and concentrated on developing Maybelline.
SW: Yes! Tom Lyle worked to build the brand using the biggest Stars in Hollywood to represent Maybelline and his brother, my grandfather Preston ran to Hollywood to hob nob with them.  Especially with Clara Bow.  However, it was also Preston who called his brother and said, “get out here, it’s Paradise.”  Tom Lyle and his partner Emery flew to Hollywood and soon rented Clara Bow’s Beach House in the Malibu Colony.  All very exciting in those days.
1920s Maybelline makeup

Clara-Bow-wears-Maybelline-mascara
Is it true that Tom bought and moved in to Rudolph Valentino’s old home?
SW: Yes!  After Rudolph Valentino died in 1926, Tom Lyle and Emery rented Clara Bow’s beach house a couple of years, and then rented Valentino’s home in the Hollywood Hills for another couple of years.  They loved the home so much that Tom Lyle bought it, had it remodeled and named it The Villa Valentino.
Tom must have been a true romantic because he remained with his life partner Emery for 50 years until he died !
SW: He and Emery met in Chicago when the Maybelline Company was just getting off the ground.  Emery was in theater and very flamboyant, talented and brilliant.  He helped Tom Lyle write the Maybelline ad’s that appeared in movie magazines.  When they moved to Hollywood, Emery continued to write copy for  Maybelline’s spectacular advertisements and remained by Tom Lyle’s side until his untimely death in 1964.  They were devoted in life and are even entombed together in death.

Sharrie Williams Dad – Bill Williams as a boy with his mother Evelyn, his uncle Tom Lyle and Tom Lyle’s lifetime partner Emery Shave sitting on the running board of a 1934 Packard
In December of 1967 the company was sold and your father”s family came into considerable fortune. Did this affect your life?
Your grand mother Evelyn married again late in life and had her will changed. Did this cause much upset?
SW: My father, was raised by his mother Evelyn and his uncle Tom Lyle, after his father Preston died.  When the Maybelline Company sold, my father inherited a fortune overnight and all of our lives changed.  It was a blessing and a curse, having so much so soon and it went to my grandmother’s head.  She was always beautiful even in her 70′s and when she got involved with a younger man and quickly married him, she took us all out of her will.  It was a nightmare to say the least, but it forced me to finally grow up and develop myself into a real person.  When I was young and so spoiled by my grandmother I never cared to do anything but shop and look beautiful.  After her death I wanted to go back to school and write my book.  It took many years, but in the end The Maybelline Story was told.
1940s Maybelline makeup ad.
The original Miss Maybelline – was your grandmother Evelyn whose famous quote was “Many a wreck is hid under a good paint job” .

Her story ends very tragically in an unsolved murder . Tell us what happened?
SW: She followed her new husband to Hot Springs Arkansas in 1974 and found out he and his ex-wife had plans to kill her and take all her money.  She survived, but got mixed up with a business partner who exploited her in the Bible Belt.  She opened her Hollywood Palace Dinner Theater and receive death threats.  You have to read the book to find out what really happened to Miss Maybelline.
Now Sharrie – be honest – do you wear Maybelline cosmetics yourself ?
SW: After The Maybelline Company sold and we were so well off . I must admit I stopped buying Maybelline and instead bought Cosmetics from Neiman Marcus. One day in my 40′s I decided to try Great Lash again and was amazed at how good it was.  I stopped using Estee Lauder mascara and started using Great Lash.  It is still the one Mascara in my make-up bag today.
Are you still proud of today’s brand of Maybelline ?
SW: Oh definitely.  Maybelline is still the number one Cosmetic brand in the world – and a Great Lash Mascara is sold every 1.7 seconds somewhere around the world.  Maybelline New York is owned by L’Oreal today and has a tremendous advertising budget…..I must admit their commercials and print ads are spectacular.  They also have a much larger line of products than the original Maybelline Company, which makes them appealing Globally.  I’m proud that the little Maybelline Company that started off with a $500 loan almost 100 years ago, is a multi-billion dollar Corporation today.  And to think that it all began with my great uncle, Tom Lyle Williams a 19 year old entrepreneur with a good idea.
If you want to read the story for yourself – treat yourself to The Maybelline Story.

Like her Nana Evelyn – Sharrie Williams herself was and remains a beautiful and glamorous woman, of whom Tom Lyle must have been justly proud, so we finish this post with a slight amendment to the following well known quote ” Maybe it’s Maybelline or maybe she was born with it !”
Glamourdaze interview with author, Sharrie Williams

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Maybelline supported the Troops during World War ll, by selling War Bonds and offering encouragement to the boys overseas

This ad was published in cooperation with the Drug,Cosmetic and Allied Industries in Modern Screen's 15TH Anniversary Edition, 1945


Maybelline - Worlds favorite eye make-up
Check out the list of Warner Brothers stars.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Here's what's happening at Maybelline New York, as they continue to Target the Millennials in their Advertising Campaigns.


Gigi Hadid and Maybelline posted announcements to social media to build buzz for #GIGIxMAYBELLINE, a range the 22-year-old model created in collaboration with the brand.



Hadid worked with Maybelline's research and innovation team over the past year on looks, shades, formulas and packaging elements.

Is's amazing to me, a descendant of the Original Maybelline Family, to watch as Maybelline New York, unfolds their new advertising strategy. 

 They now a male face representing Maybelline. 

Bloggers with large following, now collaborate with the the the company to influence a younger audience.

They've changed their "Maybe it's Maybelline" to "Make it Happen.

It's just been announced that they've contracted the  first Asian Global Face of Maybelline.

And, now for the first time, they've pulled out all the stops and come out with products that aren't actually Maybelline, but, created by 22 year old model, Gigi Hadid, ( the face of Maybelline's, products with her name in the packaging. Well Maybelline.)

Maybelline has always been first in innovative advertising, since 1915. So, maybe the Spirit of their founder, my Great uncle, Tom Lyle Williams is still working to keep the brand fresh and growing into another generation. Keep it up Maybelline NY. Tom Lyle would say keep up the good work.






Saturday, October 28, 2017

Speaking of scary nightmare stories, here is one that actually turned out to be the best thing that ever happened for Tom Lyle Williams and Maybelline.




There was a problem with the Williams Lash-Brow-Ine copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.



The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter:


In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.


Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.


It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.


In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.


There was one tiny little problem with the Williams copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.


The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter: 


In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.


Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.




There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.


It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.


In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.


Posted by

The Chicago History Journal
Chicago Law History by Joe Mathewson


Recommended reading:


Phyllis Haver: When Stars Burn Out (Tattered and Lost Ephemera)


Lash-Brow-Ine (Cosmetics and Skin)