Sunday, November 12, 2017

Maybelline supported the Troops during World War ll, by selling War Bonds and offering encouragement to the boys overseas

This ad was published in cooperation with the Drug,Cosmetic and Allied Industries in Modern Screen's 15TH Anniversary Edition, 1945


Maybelline - Worlds favorite eye make-up
Check out the list of Warner Brothers stars.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Here's what's happening at Maybelline New York, as they continue to Target the Millennials in their Advertising Campaigns.


Gigi Hadid and Maybelline posted announcements to social media to build buzz for #GIGIxMAYBELLINE, a range the 22-year-old model created in collaboration with the brand.



Hadid worked with Maybelline's research and innovation team over the past year on looks, shades, formulas and packaging elements.

Is's amazing to me, a descendant of the Original Maybelline Family, to watch as Maybelline New York, unfolds their new advertising strategy. 

 They now a male face representing Maybelline. 

Bloggers with large following, now collaborate with the the the company to influence a younger audience.

They've changed their "Maybe it's Maybelline" to "Make it Happen.

It's just been announced that they've contracted the  first Asian Global Face of Maybelline.

And, now for the first time, they've pulled out all the stops and come out with products that aren't actually Maybelline, but, created by 22 year old model, Gigi Hadid, ( the face of Maybelline's, products with her name in the packaging. Well Maybelline.)

Maybelline has always been first in innovative advertising, since 1915. So, maybe the Spirit of their founder, my Great uncle, Tom Lyle Williams is still working to keep the brand fresh and growing into another generation. Keep it up Maybelline NY. Tom Lyle would say keep up the good work.






Saturday, October 28, 2017

Speaking of scary nightmare stories, here is one that actually turned out to be the best thing that ever happened for Tom Lyle Williams and Maybelline.




There was a problem with the Williams Lash-Brow-Ine copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.



The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter:


In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.


Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.


It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.


In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.


There was one tiny little problem with the Williams copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.


The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter: 


In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.


Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.




There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.


It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.


In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.


Posted by

The Chicago History Journal
Chicago Law History by Joe Mathewson


Recommended reading:


Phyllis Haver: When Stars Burn Out (Tattered and Lost Ephemera)


Lash-Brow-Ine (Cosmetics and Skin)

Monday, October 23, 2017

When your tube of Maybelline Mascara starts to dry up try this trick


I found this article in Allure and I had to post it on my blog. I usually throw my dried up tubes of Maybelline Mascara away, doesn't everyone? But, now I will look forward to using this trick to make my sparse lashes look like I'm wearing False Lashes.  Click on this link to see how to do it. 



"I anticipate those last couple of swipes of mascara. The second the formula begins losing moisture is when I really start enjoying a mascara; if you ask me, that's when it's at its peak of usability. In fact, this is when my friends start asking me if I've gotten lash extensions. "No, it's just dry mascara," I'll tell them." 

Article from Allure https://www.allure.com/story/dry-mascara-falsies-trick#ampshare=https://www.allure.com/story/dry-mascara

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Most recent Amazon reviews for my memoir, The Maybelline Story

56 mostly flattering reviews on Amazon. 


Customer reviews

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Top customer reviews

on October 17, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase

VINE VOICEon October 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase

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on October 13, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase


The book takes you through so many historical events - events that shaped our world and women's lives.
Read it!

Published 3 months ago by Jane Jenkins


Fascinating story of the first family of cosmetics. Sublime, tragic yet triumphant tale of three generations of the
 Maybelline Dynasty. Arguably every woman has tried the cosmetics. This is a fascinating, cautionary tale of 
a iconoclastic American family.
on July 4, 2017
Loved it! I couldn't put it down! Loved the Hollywood history and glamour! The family drama was more than I
 could've imagined!

on June 7, 2017
I REALLY enjoyed this book. We are all familiar with Maybelline and it's wonderful products. It was fascinating to
 read about how the company was founded and the people involved in it. The story was developed really well and
 the characters were also developed well. I really recommend this book. It is a fascinating read.


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