Friday, December 7, 2018

Baby it's cold outside, time to cozy up and make some Maybelline Family, favorite Holiday deserts



Sharrie Williams preparing the ingredients for deserts 





                 Maybelline's namesake, Mabel Williams Hewes.

Mabel's Date Dainty Bars.


Filling:

8 oz. chopped dates
3/4 C. sugar
1 C. water
1 C. chopped nuts
Boil together the dates, water and sugar until thick. Mix in nuts. Set aside.
Crust:
1/2 lb. butter, softened
1 C. brown sugar, firmly packed
2 C. old-fashioned oats
1-1/4 C. flour
1/4 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
Combine well. Pat 2/3 of mixture into 9" X 13" pan. Spread with filling. Sprinkle reserved mixture over top. Bake at 350 for 40 minutes.


                            Mabel's sister, Eva Williams Haines.

Eva's Old Fashioned Peach Cobbler.


Peal and cut into chunks, 4 cups of fresh ripe peaches, place in a deep dish.


Sift one tsp. baking powder and 3/4 cup flour.


Mix 1 cup of sugar with flour.


Add 3/4 cup of milk.


Pour mixture over the peaches.


Melt one stick of butter and pour over the peaches and mixture.


Bake at 350, for 55 minutes.


Serve warm with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Friday, November 30, 2018

What kept Maybelline Heiress, looking youthful until her death at 77

Total Relaxation with Moist Heat Therapy

            Tom Lyle Williams with his sister-in-law, 65 year old, Evelyn Williams, 1966

I too have been using them for over 30 years and here is why...  Hydroculators are packed with soothing relief.  Chiropractors use them relax a patient's tight back after an injury and for management of pain do to:  Arthritis, Bursitis, Sprains, Strains, Backaches and stress.




  Nana had been in a couple of accidents and loved how the hydroculators relaxed not only her back but the stress on her face.  It works by releasing steam from the pack penetrating so deep it gets blood back into pinched nerves and relaxes them completely.

  I have to admit that after lying on my hydroculators or hot steam packs I sleep like a baby and my face shows no stress.  Try it and see how this secret will work for you.  Read more about Nana in my book "The Maybelline Story."  



Nana, Evelyn Williams at 77

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

HOW TO APPLY FALSE EYELASHES: EXPERT GUIDE ...Maybelline Original False Lashes 1968 to 2018




Maybelline False Lashes 1968


Maybelline False Lashes 2018



How to Apply Fake Lashes - 9 Expert Tips


How to Apply Fake Lashes - 9 Expert Tips
Trying to apply false eyelashes has never been the easiest task, especially when you’re just getting started. Many people forget to consider their eye shape before purchasing false eyelashes, leaving them in a bit of a pickle. But of course, how are you meant to know your ideal lash for your eye shape without trying them once or twice? How are you even meant to apply false lashes without ruining a couple of pairs in the process? Maybe it would just be easier to take a Flawless eyelash extension course and know how to professionally apply them instead.
Thankfully Flawless Lashes have created a 9 step infographic which can be found here, highlighting how to apply false eyelashes. The infographic can be found below and details 9 steps to ensure that you look your absolute best before heading out. A lot of the time, it comes down to preparation. Ensuring that you have a workstation that is clean and exceptionally well lit can make all the difference!
But which lashes should you go for? The eye shape bit can be a little tricky, we’ve usually found that those with rounded eye shapes suit a shorter lash and a longer lash is best suited for a hooded eye shape. In saying that, we’d suggest purchasing a few varieties and seeing which set you feel most comfortable in.
Another common mistake is attaching the eyelash quickly after applying the eyelash glue. Timing here is critical. You want to ensure that the glue is tacky before applying otherwise it will smudge outside of the lash band. This will come with experience though!


Applying false lashes doesn’t need to be a chore, but it does take practice. I guess this just means more opportunities to wear them out and look your absolute best. Follow the 9 steps below in the infographic and you’ll have natural looking falsies in no time.

[INFOGRAPHIC]  https://flawlesslashesbyloreta.com/blogs/news/how-to-apply-false-eyelashes-infographic


how to apply false eyelashes
Complete Step-by-Step Expert Guide to Applying False Eyelashes:

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The 1969 Porsche 911E, was the car I loved the most, as boy's love fast cars, and this one was a rocket!!



I remember the day that big car hauler pulled through those big electric gates at Casa Guillermo.  It was 1976 and I was all of 16 and what do you know?  I had a license!!

The driver of the truck got out and came around to the end of the trailer to release the back door and attach the tracks that would allow the machine to roll down.  One of the two men hopped into the trailer and got into that sweet ride and started it up.  I never heard such an awesome sound.  It had a throaty roar, as he backed the car up and his partner guided him down the ramp. 


My Dad put his arm around me,  as he often did, and squeezed my bicep, "hey muskels."  (Dad always had such a fun way with words,)  "What do you think of this one!  This was my cousin Bill Stroh's car, I bought it from his wife, when he passed away.  You know he used to race cars, on the professional circuit.  The motor in this car is no ordinary motor." 


 I said, "really, why is that?"  and then he paused a moment as the car backed out, and the bright sunlight hit that burnt orange paint, with the cool racing stripe across the bottom, and the word PORSCHE in it and on the back hood, all in gold lettering and beneath it -Sportomatic, 911E.  


Gleaming in the sunshine it looked like a beautiful jewel, and Dad said, "isn't she beautiful!!"  


I said so what's up with the motor Pop?  Wanting to know every detail. 


"Bill had it specially built, by his Master Mechanics, all of the pistons and rings were forged by hand out of aluminum, as well as many other parts to be extra light weight, everything about this motor was designed for ultimate performance, this motor won him many races, when it was in his race car, so when Bill retired he had this motor put into his Wife's Porsche 911E, so you see this is no ordinary car" 


"Well Dad how is that possible? I mean a race engine?, that doesn't seem legal."


"Well Press,  it had to be tuned down a bit, to make it safe for the road, and as well the car has a specialized breaking system to support the high speeds, and they modified the suspension as well all to make it fast and safe, and best of all it looks original." 


"I said oh, you mean it doesn’t' have all of the fancy spoilers and air dams to make it look fast!!"


"Yep that's it, this is a serious machine!!." 


(You see my father liked style - not so much flash, he believed that a car should maintain the original look, the classic lines, as it was designed.)  With that my palms were itching, and you bet I could not wait to show this to my friends.


So once the moving men left and the car was placed in the car port, next to all of the other beautiful cars, we looked it over, and were so impressed with how clean it was.  It looked like new, Burnt Orange, with all black leather interior.  I knew this was going to be mine some day,

Dad said, "what do you say we take her for a spin."

"Are you kidding?  You don’t' have to ask me twice," I said, and we hopped in.  Dad in the driver’s seat of course.  He turned the ignition on, and revved that throaty little beast!!  


The quick response was quite thrilling, the sportomatic transmission, was so unique, in that it had no clutch. You just let it idle, put it in 1st gear and go, and release the gas between gears, and I mean to tell you we went!! The response was amazing.   Dad just cruised at first, through the neighborhood, but he could not help himself wiping through the winding roads.   He said "she handles like a dream."   But I wanted one thing - to go fast !!!


"Hey Dad, let’s take her on to the Tram Way road."  This is a 10 mile road, with long stretches of straight ways, mixed with mountain terrain, it takes you to the base station of the Palm Springs Aerial Tram Way.  This was my favorite place to joy ride the cars and being the middle of summer in the desert, there would be no one around. 


So we made our way there, about a ten minute drive from the Casa.  Upon turning on to the tram road, off of Palm Canyon, Dad let it rip.  1st gear we hit 50 miles an hour, in what seemedlike 1.5 sec, it was like a rocket, I am telling you I have never felt G-Force ever, but that day I believe I understood the meaning, as I could barley, if at all, lean forward off of the seat, and then Dad hit second gear, and it pressed me back further into the seat and with in another second or two we were flying past 95, 3rd gear was over 120 in a second, and he shut her down, and we were blown away as this was a five speed transmission and the speedometer went from 0 to 160 and I am sure it would do all of that and more, but 120 was cool for now.


Dad did not let me drive that car for quite sometime, as he had already found out about some of my escapades, parties, and joy rides, and to think of that day, even amazes me that he was doing anything with me, because, during that period of my life, I seemed to be a loose cannon, but in any event that was a great day for us.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Veterans Day!...Graphic combat story taken from my father, Bill Williams, memories of World War 11


Bill Williams with his uncle Tom Lyle Williams at the Villa Valentino

When Bill and a few other men were sent out into the jungle to find the enemy hiding in the hills, he was excited to finally be part of some action. The worst part about looking for Japanese snipers was that they really knew how to hide well in the tropical environment and could sneak up on a soldier from behind and kill him without being detecting.


Bill and his bride, Pauline Mac Donald Williams,  My parents


It wad a well known fact that a guy could get killed right next to his buddy before anyone could do a thing. Bill had gotten used to firing at anything that moved, because back at camp, when on night duty, he was told to shoot at anything that caused the tin cans to rattle from the bobbed wire. He had machine gunned down a few dogs who snuck around at night looking for food and accidentally hit the tin cans. Maybe the men were taught to be trigger happy, and shoot first, ask questions later, rather then take chances and risk their own lives or the lives of their buddies.
Bill in the Philippians on Reconnaissance Mission
When Bill and the men got to the spot on the map where the Lieutenant reported Jap's hiding, he thought he saw something cross his path and yelled "halt, who goes there." The sniper didn't answer, and then took off running. Bill yelled again, "halt" but when he he kept running he shot him and killed him. The men slowly approached the body, to make sure he was indeed dead, and not faking it. There had been many stories of how Japs lay waiting for a soldier
to approach a dead body, then are ambushed and shot to death. Bill yelled for the others to cover him while he checked the sniper who was just a kid himself.



The other soldiers stood about 15 feet while Bill grabbed some souvenirs off the dead body, it was a right of passage,
as a soldier, his first and only kill before the war ended. Bill quickly stripped souvenirs off the enemy while the other men watched for snipers. "The only good Jap is a dead Jap," one guy said as Bill cut the snipers pockets open, reached in, and was shocked to find them full of blood. He didn't let that stop him and pulled out some Jap money, pictures, cards, and some letters. He took an aluminum canteen with carvings of a Japanese garden on it, a Japanese flag,




binoculars, and a knife. One man said to check for gold teeth, but when he looked in his mouth, he decided it would take too long to pull them out. He grabbed a watch, a compass, and a bayonet, and finally reached for the Jap's belt, only to stick his hands into his warm guts. It was an eerie feeling, but he was so pumped up that he simply
got up, didn't look back and headed down the hill with the other men.
Bill with his mother, Evelyn Williams


The G.I. 's had been warned about live mines, and it was one of their biggest fears. Stepping on a live mine could blow a man's limbs off, decapitate him, rip his guts out, blind him, and finally kill him if he was lucky. Japanese mines were very hard to find when they were buried. The men made it back to camp in one piece, and Bill told his
commanding officer about the Jap he killed, and he told Bill that he'd done the right thing, because if he hadn't of killed him, they might all have been killed. His Captain told him that it takes blood and guts to be in the infantry, and that he was proud of him.


Read more about this and more in my memoir, The Maybelline Story,  Buy my book atwww.sharriewilliamsauthor.com

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Excerpt fom The Maybelline Story



 Although Tom Lyle knew that much of the company's success was due to his own daring eye for advertising combined with Emery and Arnold’s exceptional talents, he also knew that without Rags, Maybelline would simply not have been able to stay constantly at the top of the fast-growing cosmetics market.
      For his efforts, Rags was paid solely on a commission of one and one-quarter percent of gross sales, which had risen from $359,000 at the time of his employment in 1933 to its 1955 level of over $7,000,000 a year. Knowing that this tremendous rise in sales was directly due to Rags relentleess work and devotion to the company, Tom Lyle decided to not only raise Rags' commission to one and one-half percent, but give him three percent of Maybelline’s stock.  To seal the deal, Rags would also be made Executive Vice President in charge of Sales, positioning him as an equal with Tom Lyle and Tom Lyle, Jr. --in other words, as family.
       With Rags securely placed as a jewel in Maybelline’s crown, Tom Lyle could direct his next move on the cosmetics chessboard.  Although he continued to target both the sophisticated, intelligent woman in her 30s and the more mature woman in his world-wide advertisements, as 1955 continued a new brand of female was emerging. This girl differed from both the World War II pin-up girl and Rosie the Riveter
       Thanks to movies like East of Eden staringJames Dean, and Blackboard Jungle, featuring the song “Rock Around the Clock” by Bill Haley and the Comets, “The Rebel" had become the latest cultural icon. Maybelline sales soared as heavy make-up appeared in every teenage girl's purse. The era of teen marketing was born in Jacksonville, Florida, that year, when young girls jumped out of their seats to dance at an Elvis Presley concert--the first first musical riot on record.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Overcoming the loss of a loved one, is the hardest thing we'll ever have to do. In memory of Donna Williams, and Chuck BB1, Williams

Chuck Williams, BB1

Donna Williams 


As some of my followers know, I lost my sister, Donna Williams and my cousin, Chuck Williams, BB1 this past year and though I keep putting one foot in front of the other, it's still very hard to go on without them. It's easy to act like life is the same, act the same, show up and look the same, but inside my heart and soul, things aren't the same. A big part of who I was died with them, and has forced me to reinvent myself. My fear is, who will I be and will I like my new self. Will other's accept I've changed and will I even care about the things that were once so important to me. 

 My sister, Donna especially, sometimes Chuck as well, come to me in dreams and I don't want to wake up. When I do wake up,  I  remember their gone and relive their deaths, (both of Cancer) once again. I keep combing through every step I walked with them to see if I could have done something different to save their lives. I think I've been in "shock, denial," for months. Then I slip into anger.

I'm Angry they left me alone, angry I couldn't save them, angry at God, angry at life, angry and disillusioned. Separation anxiety and guilt cause me to break down and cry when a song that reminds me of them comes on the radio. I definitely feel them with me from time to time. I get little messages that they are around me sending me love, strength and the will to live and enjoy my life. But, they were my main support system, so losing them has stripped me of my normally confident persona, and left me being a scared child with a hole in my heart.

 It's as if I lost my mom and dad, my best friends, my best halves. They are Saints in my mind. I can't remember all the things that drove me crazy about them, just the wonderful times remain. I don't think of them being sick, no, they are who they are when they were young and beautiful. That's who I miss in them, the parts that remind me of who I was when we were all young and beautiful. I know I will see them again, I know they are just in the other room, just over the horizon, just on the other side of the curtain. But, I miss their Charisma, laughter, sarcasm, cool, hep, always with it selves and that is something I can't bring back.

  If anyone can relate to a loss of a loved one, parent, husband, wife, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, best friend, co worker, neighbor, Church member, or especially a child. My heart is with you dear ones, I know what your going through and I wish all of us peace, well being restored and our hearts mended, so we can recover and go on and do what we were put here to do. Love to you all.

Sharrie Williams Author of the Maybelline Story.

Sharrie Williams, Chuck Williams, BB1, Donna Williams

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Maybelline Co is forced it to Change it's name from Lash Brow Ine, to Maybelline in 1920 because of Lawsuit

Speaking of scary nightmare stories, here is one that actually turned out to be the best thing that ever happened for Tom Lyle Williams and Maybelline.




There was a problem with the Williams Lash-Brow-Ine copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.



The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter:

In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.

Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.

It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.

In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.

There was one tiny little problem with the Williams copyright. A St. Louis man by the name of Benjamin Ansehl had started a company called Lashbrow Laboratories in 1912 and was already marketing a similar product. Williams sued for copyright infringement by Ansehl and a counter suit immediately ensued.

The case of ANSEHL v. WILLIAMS was heard in the Circuit Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, St. Louis, Missouri, July 15, 1920. You can read the entire decision, but here is a little background of the case as recorded in The Federal Reporter: 

In September, 1915, appellee [Williams], under the name of Maybell Laboratories, commenced selling at Chicago, Ill., a preparation for promoting and stimulating the growth of eyebrows and lashes, under the tradename of Lash-Brow-Ine. The name was suggested by preparations of a similar character then on the market under the names of Eye-BrowIne and Lashneen. The suffix "ine" was used, because the principal ingredient contained in appellee's preparation was chiefly petrolatum, a form of vaseline. Appellee commenced to advertise his preparation in October, 1915, and since then has advertised in over 50 different magazines, and had paid for advertising at the time of trial $67,084.19; the monthly expense for advertising having increased to about $3,000 per month. The preparation, sold directly to consumers at 50 cents per box, had amounted to 149,000 mail orders since the business was started. Sales were also made in gross to about 3,000 dealers, located in every state of the Union. Appellee testified that he never heard of Lashbrow, or Lashbrow Laboratories, until about September 1, 1918. About November 1, 1918, appellee caused appellant [Ansehl] to be notified to cease infringing appellee's trade-mark. Appellant refusing so to do, this suit was commenced December 17, 1918.

Since commencing the sale of his preparation appellee has done a business amounting to $111,759.73. The trade-mark Lash-Brow-Ine was registered in the United States Patent Office April 24, 1917. The main ingredients of the preparation sold by appellee were a superfine petrolatum and paraffine, a high-grade perfume, and other small ingredients. No reply was received by appellee to the notification above stated until November 11, 1918, when the receipt of the letter of appellee of November 1, 1918, was acknowledged with a statement that appellant had used the trade-mark "Lashbrow" much earlier than 1915, and a request that appellee desist from infringing the same, or suit would be brought by the appellant for an injunction and an accounting. No such suit was brought.



There was introduced in evidence a large number of advertisements appearing in various publications. The evidence on the part of appellant showed that he conceived the idea of manufacturing and putting on the market a preparation for stimulating and promoting the growth of eyebrows and eyelashes in 1911; that the formula for this preparation was one used by his mother for her eyebrows and eyelashes when she was a girl. Appellant commenced selling his preparation in the spring of 1912, under the trade-mark of "Lashbrow," to a small drug store on Jefferson and Lafayette avenues in the city of St. Louis, Mo. This was followed by soliciting trade from all the large dealers and retail stores in St. Louis, where the preparation was offered for sale. Appellant then started a campaign of advertising which began on October 12, 1912, in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This advertising brought him business from nearby states, such as Illinois and Indiana, and the entire Southwest. Appellant's business has been conducted since its commencement at 1755 Preston street, St. Louis, Mo., where he was doing business when enjoined in May, 1919. The stores referred to by appellant in his testimony were Wolf-Wilson, Judge & Dolph, Grand Leader, Famous & Barr, Nugent's, Hirsch's Hair Bazaar, and Schaper, being the leading stores in St. Louis. The preparation was sold through these stores in 1912. Appellant had printed 1,000 cardboard fliers and 1,000 transparent fliers, which were mailed to about 1,500 stores throughout the United States. A counter display card was also distributed throughout the country in 1913. A sample of appellant's preparation was mailed to the buyers of about 800 or 900 department stores throughout the country.

It's an interesting look at doing business in the early twentieth century and the birth of a mega corp.

In October, 1920 the decision was set down in favor of Benjamin Ansehl. Williams had to stop using the Lash-Brow-Ine name. From then on the ads, like the one at left featuring film star Phyllis Haver, featured only the Maybelline name. Williams had lost the battle. But a walk down any cosmetics aisle will tell you he clearly won the war.

Posted by
The Chicago History Journal
Chicago Law History by Joe Mathewson

Friday, October 26, 2018

Interview with Glamourdaze - History of Mascara – Maybel Williams and The Maybelline Story


How many women in the world are aware that they owe a debt of gratitude to a young lady called Maybel Williams – 

The resourceful girl had a flash of inspiration and burned a cork, mixed the ashes with some Vaseline and then applied it to what was left of her lashes. In an instant she resembled a Hollywood starlet! ‘Eureka!’ – mascara was born ! Not exactly of course. The art of dying lashes goes back to Cleopatra, but there was no removable cosmetic of this kind that a woman could buy over the counter
.
Her brother Tom along with his brother Noel took this idea and developed Lash Brow Line – the worlds first commercially available mascara.In 1916 he changed the name to Maybelline – named after – you guessed it – Maybel Williams! The name being a combination of Maybel and Vaseline !

1920-lash brow-ine—early-Maybelline product
Eugene Rimmel is also credited for producing the first petroleum jelly mix but the product that we all know and love today is without question down to the success of Maybelline. The story of Maybelline is not only one of glamor and success but of mystery and intrigue which until recently has remained untold. The big money did not actually come in to the family until the company was sold in 1967.
1930s Maybelline makeup ad
In 1978  came the mysterious murder of the original  ‘Miss Maybelline’ – who died when her home was bombed. Maybelline heiress Sharrie Williams – Miss Maybelline’s grand-daughter  and Tom and Maybels great niece – now tells the true story – and I can certainly say it has all the ingredients of a real dynasty drama in her book “The Maybelline Story” Sharrie has very kindly agreed to talk to Glamourdaze.
Sharrie , can you give us a quick synopsis of the Maybelline Story?
SW: The Maybelline Story traces the history of cosmetics in America and how one simple eye product caught the imagination of the public. Yet, unlike any other book about beauty, it reveals the never-before-told story of this man who invented mascara, Tom Lyle Williams (my great uncle)–a private figure who hid from the public because he was gay. To stay safe from the scrutiny of the press and government (which in the early thirties deemed mascara the “province of whores and homosexuals), Tom Lyle cloistered himself behind the gates of his Rudolph Valentino Villa and, with the help of his lifetime lover Emery, ran his empire from a distance. The deeper Tom Lyle went into hiding, the more his sister-in-law and ultra-ego Evelyn (my grandmother,) struggled her way to the spotlight. Attracted to bad boys, she married one–Tom Lyle’s playboy brother Preston (my grandfather). From that moment on, Evelyn used the Maybelline name–and later, its money–to reinvent herself from circus ballerina to flamboyant flapper, extravagant socialite to dinner theater star. Now, after nearly a century of silence, this true story celebrates the lives of a forgotten American hero–one man forced to remain behind a mask, and one woman whose hunger for beauty ultimately destroyed her. Spanning three generations, The Maybelline Story shows the hidden haunts of sudden fortune, and the tragedy that ensues when vanity lets loose. Finally, it speaks to women s’ decade-long desires–to be beautiful and be loved–and asks the question: At what price, beauty?
What is interesting is that the whole family became involved in Tom’s enterprise starting with your great uncle Noel along with your grandad Preston and grand aunt Eva! Did Mabel have anything to do with the business?
SW:Tom Lyle renamed his first eye beauty product Lash-Brow-Ine, to Maybelline in honor of his sister Mabel who gave him the idea for mascara, in 1915.  She had burned her lashes and brows tried to make them grow back and look darker by mixing a concoction of Vaseline and ash from a burned cork in her hand and applying it to her brows and lashes.  Tom Lyle took the idea to a chemist and Maybell Laboratories was born.
Your Grandmother Evelyn became the first Miss Maybelline ?
SW: My grandmother got that title when she opened a Dinner Theater in Hot Springs Arkansas in 1978.  She promoted herself as Miss Maybelline  “Last of the Red Hot Mama’s!” Her story ends in tragedy.

Evelyn Williams with her glamorous sisters Verona-and–Bunny-1922
What are your memories of visiting your grand uncle Tom as a young teenager ? I suppose there was lots of free make-up on the go !
SW: My favorite memory is driving all my best girlfriends up to his  estate in Bel Air California, in my blue and white 1957 Chevy so we could get some samples of Maybelline for a raffle our Club was having. He not only gave us the raffle samples, he gave us a giant box of Maybelline products to split up between us. It was the most exciting thing that could happen to a bunch of 17 year old High School girls – a years supply of our favorite cosmetics for free!

Tom-Lyle-Williams—Maybelline-founder

Sharrie-Williams-with-Tom-Lyle–Maybelline-founder
As Maybelline took off with glamorous stars like Clara Bow lending their name to the brand – it must have been very exciting. Did your grandfather Preston and your great uncle Tom Lyle enjoy the trappings of Hollywood and all that went with it? It appears that while Preston partied – Tom kept his nose to the grind- stone and concentrated on developing Maybelline.
SW: Yes! Tom Lyle worked to build the brand using the biggest Stars in Hollywood to represent Maybelline and his brother, my grandfather Preston ran to Hollywood to hob nob with them.  Especially with Clara Bow.  However, it was also Preston who called his brother and said, “get out here, it’s Paradise.”  Tom Lyle and his partner Emery flew to Hollywood and soon rented Clara Bow’s Beach House in the Malibu Colony.  All very exciting in those days.
1920s Maybelline makeup

Clara-Bow-wears-Maybelline-mascara
Is it true that Tom bought and moved in to Rudolph Valentino’s old home?
SW: Yes!  After Rudolph Valentino died in 1926, Tom Lyle and Emery rented Clara Bow’s beach house a couple of years, and then rented Valentino’s home in the Hollywood Hills for another couple of years.  They loved the home so much that Tom Lyle bought it, had it remodeled and named it The Villa Valentino.
Tom must have been a true romantic because he remained with his life partner Emery for 50 years until he died !
SW: He and Emery met in Chicago when the Maybelline Company was just getting off the ground.  Emery was in theater and very flamboyant, talented and brilliant.  He helped Tom Lyle write the Maybelline ad’s that appeared in movie magazines.  When they moved to Hollywood, Emery continued to write copy for  Maybelline’s spectacular advertisements and remained by Tom Lyle’s side until his untimely death in 1964.  They were devoted in life and are even entombed together in death.

Sharrie Williams Dad – Bill Williams as a boy with his mother Evelyn, his uncle Tom Lyle and Tom Lyle’s lifetime partner Emery Shave sitting on the running board of a 1934 Packard
In December of 1967 the company was sold and your father”s family came into considerable fortune. Did this affect your life?
Your grand mother Evelyn married again late in life and had her will changed. Did this cause much upset?
SW: My father, was raised by his mother Evelyn and his uncle Tom Lyle, after his father Preston died.  When the Maybelline Company sold, my father inherited a fortune overnight and all of our lives changed.  It was a blessing and a curse, having so much so soon and it went to my grandmother’s head.  She was always beautiful even in her 70′s and when she got involved with a younger man and quickly married him, she took us all out of her will.  It was a nightmare to say the least, but it forced me to finally grow up and develop myself into a real person.  When I was young and so spoiled by my grandmother I never cared to do anything but shop and look beautiful.  After her death I wanted to go back to school and write my book.  It took many years, but in the end The Maybelline Story was told.
1940s Maybelline makeup ad.
The original Miss Maybelline – was your grandmother Evelyn whose famous quote was “Many a wreck is hid under a good paint job” .
Her story ends very tragically in an unsolved murder . Tell us what happened?
SW: She followed her new husband to Hot Springs Arkansas in 1974 and found out he and his ex-wife had plans to kill her and take all her money.  She survived, but got mixed up with a business partner who exploited her in the Bible Belt.  She opened her Hollywood Palace Dinner Theater and receive death threats.  You have to read the book to find out what really happened to Miss Maybelline.
Now Sharrie – be honest – do you wear Maybelline cosmetics yourself ?
SW: After The Maybelline Company sold and we were so well off . I must admit I stopped buying Maybelline and instead bought Cosmetics from Neiman Marcus. One day in my 40′s I decided to try Great Lash again and was amazed at how good it was.  I stopped using Estee Lauder mascara and started using Great Lash.  It is still the one Mascara in my make-up bag today.
Are you still proud of today’s brand of Maybelline ?
SW: Oh definitely.  Maybelline is still the number one Cosmetic brand in the world – and a Great Lash Mascara is sold every 1.7 seconds somewhere around the world.  Maybelline New York is owned by L’Oreal today and has a tremendous advertising budget…..I must admit their commercials and print ads are spectacular.  They also have a much larger line of products than the original Maybelline Company, which makes them appealing Globally.  I’m proud that the little Maybelline Company that started off with a $500 loan almost 100 years ago, is a multi-billion dollar Corporation today.  And to think that it all began with my great uncle, Tom Lyle Williams a 19 year old entrepreneur with a good idea.
If you want to read the story for yourself – treat yourself to The Maybelline Story.

Like her Nana Evelyn – Sharrie Williams herself was and remains a beautiful and glamorous woman, of whom Tom Lyle must have been justly proud, so we finish this post with a slight amendment to the following well known quote ” Maybe it’s Maybelline or maybe she was born with it !”
You can catch another excellent interview with Sharrie with Kay at Movie Star Makeover
Finally a vintage Maybelline TV ad on our Youtube channel. Enjoy! To view please go to...http://glamourdaze.com/2012/10/mascara-maybel-williams-and-the-maybelline-story.html