Thursday, October 20, 2011

Betty Grable and Harry James - Hollywood's Dream Duo.

Betty Grable and Harry James. 
Star Quality that personified Hollywood's Swing-Era!


Betty Grable, "The Queen of the Hollywood musical,"  married Bandleader, Harry James, in 1943.  A popular GI slogan during the war became ‘I want a girl just like the girl that married Harry James’
  

20th Century-Fox, who had her under contract, insured her legs with Lloyds of London for a million dollars.


In 1947 the US Treasury Department noted that she was the highest paid star in America earning $300,000 a year.                                                                                                                                            

Betty Grable appeared in Maybelline advertisements throughout the War Years.  Not only to promote her latest musical, but to endorse War Bonds.  She was one of Tom Lyle's favorite Stars - introduced to him by his long time friend Alice Faye.


Harry James was an instrumentalist of the Swing Era, employing a bravura playing style that made his trumpet work identifiable.


Garble eventually gave up Hollywood, to spend more time at the couples, San Fernando Ranch, and raised two daughters, as well as Thoroughbred horses.


The Charismatic couple was often spotted at Santa Anita, or Del Mar racetrack, sitting in their private box. They were known as "the nicest people you'd ever want to meet," never refusing autographs to admiring fans. 


Grable and James owned several thoroughbred racehorses that won races such as the California Breeders' Champion Stakes (1951) and the San Vicente Stakes (1954). He was also a founding investor in the Atlantic City Race Course.
Harry James and Betty Grable - I Can't Begin To Tell You - released in 1945





Read more about Betty Grable, Alice Faye and Tom Lyle Williams friendship, in The Maybelline Story.  

2 comments:

  1. I'm looking for information about their wedding at The Last Frontier in the Little Church of the West. Did they have a reception there as well? I'm writing a historical fiction and my characters are working at The Last Frontier in 1943 and wanted to put them there as workers witnessing the wedding.

    Thanks,

    ~Tam Francis~
    www.girlinthejitterbugdress.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm sorry I don't know for sure. But if it's fiction, you can take literary license, to make it fun

    ReplyDelete